Created 09/09/2019
13 Sep
2019
13h30
Station Biologique de Roscoff - Salle de conférence
Anthropogenic and biotic processes influencing marine bio-invasions along changing coastlines… insights from in situ experiments in Central Chile

Biological invasions and the changes in land and sea use are amongst the five major causes of global biodiversity decline.

Jean-Charles Leclerc

Biological invasions and the changes in land and sea use are amongst the five major causes of global biodiversity decline. Shipping and ocean sprawl (multiplication of artificial structures at the expense of natural habitats) are considered as the major forces responsible for marine invasions and biotic homogenization. And yet, there is little evidence of their interplay on community assembly at multiple spatial scales. In this framework, we examined the patterns and processes influencing marine bio-invasions along the developing coastal region of Concepción, central Chile. Combining a series of field surveys and experimental works at different spatial scales, we determined the distributions of native and non-indigenous species and quantified some of the ecological interactions influencing community assembly across artificial habitat types and maritime traffic conditions.